When Implementing Behavioral Science, What Is the Role of a Choice Architect?

23 Nov

This post is based on an answer I wrote in response to a question posed to me on Quora, “What do choice architects do?” I wanted to repost my answer here because I still feel there is a lack of understanding about what it means to implement nudging and behavioral science within companies, and the role of choice architects are key.

Choice architects essentially use insights from behavioral science to design environments for people that encourage or support some sort of end goals.

For example, suppose there are a layered set of three main goals to encourage people to 1) participate in a retirement savings plan, 2) save enough money, and 3) invest wisely. A choice architect may address behavioral obstacles that may hamper these goals from being met through creating solutions. These solutions could include auto-enrolling people into a retirement plan (versus having them opt-in) to address behavioral obstacles associated with status quo biases that hamper participation in a saving plan. In order to get people to get to healthy saving rates over time, the architect may create a way for people to commit today to savings increasing in the future (a process which addresses psychological biases associated with present bias and hyperbolic discounting). Finally, an architect may default most people into an automatically managed, diversified portfolio that evolves as the person reaches and continues into retirement. This essentially makes a healthy investment choice easy as a default for most people and for most of their money.

So choice architects do the following things:

  1. They identify goals of all constituents, any guardrails (e.g., ethical, philosophical, financial), and desired outcome measurements.
  2. They look for behavioral obstacles that people face in whatever environment is being addresses or designed (e.g., financial spending, medication adherence, governmental compliance).
  3. Architects try to leverage behavioral science research where they can (e.g., to inform the precise nature of obstacles, potential ways to address).
  4. They innovate and try to create solutions and interventions to address behavioral obstacles (e.g., website design, text messages, email content, customer outreach, product design, decision tools).
  5. Architects also look to measure and perform A/B testing where they can to see how solutions and interventions impact outcomes.

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